BIM TRIAL: PROJECT OVE

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The study of human anatomy has traditionally been the domain of physicians, dentists, physiotherapists, nurses, paramedics, and other health professionals. What happens when you let building designers have a crack at replicating it? Project OVE.

Project OVE started as an internal initiative that has evolved into something with far greater potential. The multi-firm collaborative culture nurtured on the project is a brilliant example of the UK BIM community’s willingness to share information and dedicate resource to projects that push the industry forward as a whole.

The project itself was publically unveiled at Autodesk University in December 2013 and the reaction since has been overwhelming.

We have been approached by education initiatives, tier one contractors, visualisation companies, quantity surveyors and more, all of whom wish to contribute to the project moving forward. This is in addition to the voluntary contribution already made by staff from London Underground, FARO, Tekla and Soluis.

There is now also a growing contingent of organizations who wish to showcase the innovative workflows developed on Project OVE, all of which we are publishing for public reference. In addition to conferences, there are also numerous institutions that wish to showcase the project to their members as a demonstration of the efficiency savings BIM can deliver. Finally, we are also in talks with a large software provider about presenting the project to a number of their users.

We chose to create a building with hugely complex geometry, completely unorthodox design challenges and a unique aesthetic to help the industry articulate tangible benefits of BIM, but we achieved far more and there’s huge potential for future development.

The study of human anatomy has traditionally been the domain of physicians, dentists, physiotherapists, nurses, paramedics, and other health professionals. What happens when you let building designers have a crack at replicating it?